Tag: "cryopreservation"

  • Cryopreservation of Epididymal Alpaca (Vicugna pacos) Sperm: a Comparison of Citrate-, Tris- and Lactose-Based Diluents and Pellets and Straws

    Epididymal spermatozoa were harvested from male alpacas and frozen after extension and cooling to 4°C in citrate-, Tris- and lactose-based diluents (Experiment 1) and as pellets in 0.25- and 0.5-mL straws on either dry ice or over liquid nitrogen vapour (Experiment 2) to determine the effects diluents and packaging on their motility and acrosome integrity. In Experiment 1, sperm motility was higher after cooling to 4°C and after freeze–thawing (0 but not 3 h post-thaw) for spermatozoa extended in the lactose- than the citrate- or Tris-based diluent (P < 0.05). Post-thaw acrosome integrity after cooling to 4°C and post-thaw (0 h) was reduced for spermatozoa frozen in citrate- compared with lactose- or Tris-based diluents, but was similar for all groups 3 h after thawing. In Experiment 2, sperm motility immediately after thawing was higher for pellet freezing than for 0.25- or 0.5-mL straws on dry ice or liquid nitrogen vapour (P < 0.05), although by 3 h post-thaw motility was similar for pellets and straws (P > 0.05). Acrosome integrity was similar for all groups immediately after thawing and 3 h post-thaw. Cryopreservation of epididymal alpaca spermatozoa is feasible, with retained motility and acrosome integrity post-thaw. Freezing as pellets in a lactose-based diluent is recommended. more »
  • Effect of Glycerol Concentration, Equex STM® Supplementation and Liquid Storage Prior to Freezing on the Motility and Acrosome Integrity of Frozen-Thawed Epididymal Alpaca (Vicugna pacos) Sperm

    Two experiments were conducted to determine the effects of glycerol concentration and Equex STM® paste on the post-thaw motility and acrosome integrity of epididymal alpaca sperm. In Experiment 1, epididymal sperm were harvested from male alpacas, diluted, and cooled to 4 °C in a Lactose cooling extender, and pellet-frozen in a Lactose cryodiluent containing final glycerol concentrations of 2, 3, or 4%. In Experiment 2, epididymal sperm were diluted in Biladyl®, cooled to 4 °C, stored at that temperature for 18–24 h, and further diluted with Biladyl® without or with Equex STM® paste (final concentration 1% v:v) before pellet freezing. In Experiment 1, sperm motility was not affected by glycerol concentration immediately (2%: 16.1 ± 4.6%; 3%: 20.5 ± 5.9% and 4%: 18.5 ± 6.6%; P > 0.05) or 3h post thaw (< 5% for all groups; P > 0.05). Post-thaw acrosome integrity was similar for sperm frozen in 2% (83.6 ± 1.6%), 3% (81.3 ± 2.0%) and 4% glycerol (84.8 ± 2.0%; P > 0.05) but was higher 3h post-thaw for sperm frozen in 3% (75.7 ± 3.8%) and 4% (77.2 ± 4.1%) than 2% glycerol (66.9 ± 2.7%; P < 0.05). In Experiment 2, sperm motility was higher immediately after thawing for sperm frozen in the presence of Equex STM® (Equex®: 21.5 ± 3.5%; control: 14.4 ± 2.1%; P < 0.05) but was similar at 3h post-thaw (P > 0.05). Acrosome integrity was similar for sperm frozen with or without Equex STM® paste immediately (control: 89.6 ± 1.2%; Equex®: 91.1 ± 1.4%; P > 0.05) and 3 h post-thaw (control: 69.3 ± 3.7%; Equex®: 59.9 ± 5.8%; P > 0.05). Sperm cryopreserved in medium containing 3–4% glycerol and 1% Equex STM® retained the best motility and acrosome integrity, even after liquid storage for 18–24 h at 4 °C prior to cryopreservation. more »
  • Advancing Assisted Reproductive Technologies in Camelids (Especially the Alpaca)

    Despite being widely used for long-term storage and dissemination of male genetic material in many species, semen cryopreservation and artificial insemination (AI) are not well-developed for camelids. The main reason for the delay in developing these technologies is the poor semen quality of camelids and the viscous nature of the seminal plasma, particularly in alpacas and llamas. An effective sperm cryopreservation and artificial insemination program would allow alpaca producers to cheaply and safely disseminate superior male genetics throughout the national herd and beyond. This report is aimed at all alpaca industry members and researchers in camelid reproduction and production. Alpaca farms are spread across Australia, but concentrated in the eastern states. All alpaca producers will find this report relevant. It will be of particular interest to those already incorporating assisted reproductive technologies (such as embryo transfer) into their husbandry or those wanting to increase the genetic diversity of their herd. more »

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