• US Alpaca Fiber Production- A Snapshot as at October 2011, Part Two

    Part Two: A look at estimated fiber production of the US suri herd based on registration data supplied by the Alpaca Register Inc. (now called the Alpaca Owners of America) and extended to include non-registered alpacas in the American herd. more »
  • US Alpaca Fiber Production- A Snapshot as at October 2011, Part One

    Part One: A look at estimated fiber production of the US huacaya herd based on registration data supplied by the Alpaca Register Inc. (now called the Alpaca Owners of America) and extended to include non-registered alpacas in the American herd. more »
  • Meningeal Worm Literature Review with Implications for Alpaca Owners

    Meningeal worm (Parelaphostrongylus tenuis) is a parasite of special concern for many alpaca farmers. Carried by white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) and intermediate slug and snail hosts, “m-worm”, as it is commonly known, lives and reproduces in the deer. Although the deer are generally not affected by the parasite, any other animal ingesting an infected slug or snail is usually killed by the activity of the parasite as it travels through the nervous system. more »
  • Culture-Positive Sepsis in Neonatal Camelids: 21 Cases

    Crias with sepsis do not appear to present with major biochemical, hematologic, or blood gas abnormalities, potentially complicating diagnosis. Affected crias may not have localizing signs at presentation and are not usually febrile, although hypothermia, tachypnea, and tachycardia are relatively common. Total protein concentration was not a substitute for immunoglobulin G measurement in septic crias in this study. Familiarity with the clinical presentation and common pathogens isolated should improve early recognition and treatment and ultimately outcome of crias with sepsis. more »
  • Thiamine Depletion and Polioencephalomalacia: What Every Alpaca Owner Needs to Know

    The vitamin thiamine plays a critical role in alpaca health. Thiamine depletion can happen rapidly from a large number of causes and will lead to death unless promptly remedied by the immediate administration of injectable thiamine. Thiamine is inexpensive, but only available by prescription (in the United States) – and every camelid owner should have a bottle from their vet on hand at all times. more »

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